Research Library

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As part of our commitment to making our work and outputs accessible, and to generate further dialogue on the issues we explore, IICSI has created an online Research Library. Here you will find a range of pieces including films, articles, think pieces, and interviews. Please use the search function or browse, and check back again as this library will be updated regularly.

Research outcomes related to the Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice project (2007-2013) are available in the ICASP Research Collection.

Stories of Impact: Heather

In celebration of the 10th anniversary of KidsAbility and IICSI’s partnership, filmmaker Kimber Sider created this short film exploring the impact of this program over the years through speaking with KidsAbility recreation therapist Heather Granger about the impact of the Play Who You Are workshop series.

Stories of Impact: Katy

IICSI’s Stories of Impact are a new series exploring IICSI’s research and the wide-ranging impacts. In celebration of the 10th anniversary of KidsAbility and IICSI’s partnership, filmmaker Dawn Matheson created this short film exploring the impact of this program on Katy, a participant of Play Who You Are over many years.

Stories of Impact: Talia

Stories of Impact: Talia

IICSI’s Stories of Impact are a new series exploring IICSI’s research and the wide-ranging impacts. In celebration of the 10th anniversary of KidsAbility and IICSI’s partnership, filmmaker Erin MacIndoe Sproule created this short film exploring the impact of this program on Talia, a participant of Play Who You Are over many years.

Dong-Won Kim

The Art Of Risk: Negotiating Unfamiliar Territory in Large-group Improvisation

By Jason Caslor, Arizona State University In 2014, Musagetes, IICSI and the Laurier Centre for Music in the Community’s Improviser-in-Residence, Dong-Won Kim, spent the fall in Guelph bringing together a myriad of musicians and artists through improvised music and dance. His residency culminated on November 28th with a most unique collaboration involving 20 members of…

crossings project poster

The Crossings Project – Exile, Exodus, and Transformation

Video documenation of THE CROSSINGS PROJECT – a community music and multi-media event and performed to a sold-out audience in Guelph on Saturday evening, May 26, 2018. The intention of this endeavour was to tell the story of the trans-Atlantic slave trade (approximately 1526 – 1867) and the subsequent establishment of a Black community in Guelph, Ontario.

The House of Song and Sound by Genetic Choir

The multi-national vocal improvisation group Genetic Choir is proud to announce the release of a new publication: The House of Song and Sound: The Stem & Luister Method. This booklet provides insights into a project, started by Genetic Choir, that involves using improvisation as a tool in the context of working with people with verbal…

Improvise Here

The Improvisation Toolkit and Resources

The Improvisation Toolkit includes simple and direct instructions for games, activities and strategies to add improvisation to your classroom and a Toolkit Resource List of external resources relevant to the Improvisation Toolkit including sources on games, school and university classes, special needs, at-risk youth are available as a single download.

What We All Long For Dionne Brand book cover

Think Piece: Oku’s Sounds: Anthony Braxton and Musical Improvisation in Dionne Brand’s What We All Long For

Improvised music plays an important role in Dionne Brand’s 2005 novel What We All Long For, which tells the intertwined story of four ethnically and racially diverse twenty-somethings living in downtown Toronto.

In this Think Piece, Lefrense details how the musical practices of one of the four protagonists Oku, a second-generation Caribbean-Canadian, projects his “politics of being” through a personally curated soundtrack.

Thinking Spaces 2022: Catharine Cary

This Thinking Spaces session, with guest Catharine Cary, took place on February 25, 2022. This presentation, entitled “The Upside Down Protocol,” saw multi-modal improvisational practitioner Catharine Cary consider the question: “How can we turn on its head everything we think we know, and provoke play by having a mind and body subtle and supple enough…

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